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Anastrozole(CAS:120511-73-1)
Anastrozole
Anastrozole(CAS:120511-73-1)

Name

Anastrozole

CAS

120511-73-1

Synonyms

ICI-D-1033;ARIMIDEX;1-[3,5-DI-(1-METHYL-1-CYANO)-ETHYL]-BENZYL-1,2,4-TRIAZOLE;
ANASTRAZOLE;ANASTROZOLE;tetramethyl-5-(1h-1,2,4-triazol-1ylmethyl)
1,3-benzenediacetionitrile;ZD-1033;1,3-benzenediacetonitrile,alpha,alpha,alpha’,
alpha’-tetramethyl-5-(1h-1,2,4-t

MF

C17H19N5

MW

293.37

Others

Anastrozole (INN) (marketed under the trade name Arimidex by AstraZeneca) is a non-steroidal[3] aromatase-inhibiting drug approved for treatment of breast cancer after surgery, as well as for metastasis in both pre and post-menopausal women. The severity of breast cancer can be increased by estrogen, as sex hormones cause hyperplasia, and differentiation at estrogen receptor sites.[4] Anastrozole works by inhibiting the synthesis of estrogen. The patent on Arimidex by AstraZeneca expired June 2010.

The ATAC (Arimidex, Tamoxifen, Alone or in Combination) trial was an international randomised controlled trial of 9366 women with localized breast cancer who received either anastrozole, tamoxifen, or both for five years, followed by five years of follow-up.[5] After more than 5 years the group that received anastrozole had significantly better clinical results than the tamoxifen group.[5] The trial suggested that anastrozole is the preferred medical therapy for postmenopausal women with localized breast cancer, which is estrogen receptor (ER) positive.[5] Another study found that the risk of recurrence was reduced 40%, but was associated with an increased risk of bone fractures. The study concluded that ER positive patients benefited from switching from tamoxifen to anastrozole in patients who have completed 2 years' adjuvant tamoxifen.[6] A more recent trial found that anastrozole significantly reduced the incidence of breast cancer in postmenopausal women relative to placebo, and while there were side effects related to estrogen deprivation observed, the researchers concluded that this was probably not related to the treatment. Lead author Jack Cuzick was quoted by the BBC as saying, "This class of drugs is more effective than previous drugs such as tamoxifen and crucially, it has fewer side effects," adding that he thought there was now enough evidence to support offering the drug.[7]